Arts & Entertainment

This One-Day Exhibit Features Young Street Photographers' Tribute to Escolta

Today is your chance to see Escolta in a new light.
IMAGE Jilson Tiu
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From its heyday as a financial district to its current status as an up-and-coming cultural hub, Escolta has always been known for its character and architecture. Today, thirteen photographers from Street Sixty Three and Local Frame Movement—including Esquire contributor Jilson Tiu, whose knack for capturing the magic in mundane, everyday Manila scenes has recently earned him a lot of fans—are working to revive this historic street by showcasing its beauty at the Escolta 1006 exhibit.

Here’s a sneak peek of what you can expect:








Street photographers Wachico De Leon, Adrian Go Cablitas, Denselle Bularan, BJ Tangco, Zaldine Jae Alvaro, Charles Ramento, and Jewel Basinang will also be showcasing their work. Escolta 1006 is open today, November25, 2017, from 11:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. at the First United Building. It’s a one-day exhibit, so catch it while you can. Afterwards, you can take a piece of Escolta home with you, since they’ll be selling prints and postcards as well.

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Angelica Gutierrez
Angelica is currently Editorial Assistant for Esquiremag.ph.
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