Lifestyle

The Dalai Lama's Guide to Getting Through the Next 4 Years

"Constant anger is bad for your health."
IMAGE Esquire
Comments

What a pit we've fallen into. Nevertheless, the Dalai Lama, the exiled spiritual leader of Tibet, maintains our "surrounding situation" should not be the end to all happiness.

His Holiness spoke with Dr. Sanjay Gupta of CNN before President Trump's inauguration about preserving hope through the next four years. He professed his optimism for America, saying Donald Trump is but one man in a nation that "belongs to the people." We'll see.

This is the Dalai Lama's sage advice:

Have more compassion for yourself.

That means less self-criticism. If someone is "honest, truthful," about themselves, embracing the good and the bad, they can find happiness "no matter what [the] surrounding situation," the Dalai Lama told Gupta.

Think more.

Not about the news or work, but about yourself and your experiences. "Nothing exists as [it] appears," the Dalai Lama said. When you reflect on emotions, "then the very basis of these negative emotions becomes thinner, thinner, thinner." His Holiness wakes up at 3 a.m. to meditate for five hours, but 10 minutes of mindfulness a day works too.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Get good friends.

"Constant anger is very bad for our health," he said. So he thinks about compassion and makes sure he is "surrounded by [other] compassionate people." He continued later: "We need friend. In order to develop genuine friendship, trust is very important. For trust, if you show them genuine sort of respect, genuine love, then trust come."

Serve.

By being in the service of others, "no matter what [the] surrounding situation, you can keep self-confidence and happiness."

Remember you were a kid once.

Because kids "don't care what's their religion, what's their nationality, they don't care what sort of family background" they have, the Dalai Lama said. "Basic human nature is compassionate."

So, lead a compassionate and mindful life—easier said than done. His Holiness also said it is important for a leader, spiritual or otherwise, to "act like a human being." Again, we'll see.

This story originally appeared on Esquire.com.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

* Minor edits have been made by the Esquiremag.ph editors.

Comments
View More Articles About:
About The Author
Sarah Rense
View Other Articles From Sarah
Comments
Latest Feed
 
Share
Loading screens will soon feel as antiquated as sticking cartridges into your N64
 
Share
The HBO show might be over, but A Song of Ice and Fire still has two books to go.
 
Share
Snap your summer pics with a OneStep 2 camera on Stranger Things-inspired film.
 
Share
New series like Russian Doll, I Think You Should Leave, and Special are the anti-Game of Thrones
 
Share
A new, non-surgical treatment claims to eradicate droopy jowls in under an hour. But is it too good to be true? Rob Crossan tries to roll back the years with a bout of 'Ultherapy.'
 
Share
A new study shows that a not-zero percentage of dudes enlist their buddies' help in grooming "down there."
 
Share
Not as awkward as destroying a city and murdering innocents with a dragon, but still quite awkward
 
Share
Huni Lio is Ayala Land's sustainable, eco-friendly, and inexpensive resort in El Nido, Palawan,.
 
Share
You don't have to go far from the city to get to some of the best snorkeling spots in the Philippines.
 
Share
For Esquire US' Summer 2019 issue, they assembled Quentin Tarantino and his two leading men for their first conversation since they wrapped Taratino's ninth film, which premiered at Cannes Tuesday.
Load More Articles