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A Brutal Coral Bleaching Event Is Happening in Batangas, Mindoro, and More

It's definitely alarming.
IMAGE WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
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2020 is really that year. From a pandemic to murder hornets to an asteroid that came relatively close to us, it's like there's a new thing that threatens all of humanity each week. The latest thing we have to be alarmed about, or rather, we should have been alarmed about from the start is a coral bleaching event.

The Philippine Coral Bleaching Watch, powered by the University of the Philippines Marine Science Institute and the Philippine Department of Environment and Natural Resources, just gave an update for an alert level 2 in parts of Batangas, including Tayabas Bay, parts of Mindoro in Tablas Strait, and Guimaras Strait in Western Visayas.

Coral bleaching is when corals expel their nutrients to destress, losing their color. The usual cause of coral bleaching is rising water temperatures due to global warming. According to experts, stopping coal-fired plants and open waste burning would be the first step toward recovery.

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That's not all. The page also reported that coral bleaching is still likely happening in other parts of Western and Central Philippines. Seriously, take a look at the map below and see how red everything is for yourself.

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On June 26, the Philippine Coral Bleaching Watch confirmed the coral bleaching in Danjugan Island, Negros Occidental. It's definitely alarming—especially considering that it's just one of the massive coral bleaching events that happened in June. If you're wondering what you can do, it's as simple as being on the lookout.

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According to the page, the best thing we can do is to be part of the watch. "Help us look for healthy, non-bleaching reefs," it said. "Please continue to be our eyes underwater. If you do manage to be in the water, please be on the lookout if your reef areas are bleaching or not bleaching. We need to monitor reefs that are resilient to heat stress, and reefs that are able to recover."

More: Google Earth Has a Street View of Tubbataha Reef

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Paolo Chua
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