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Gen X-Ers, You're Too Old to Still Be Clubbing

No titos at the club.
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The people (at least people in the United Kingdom) have spoken: Generation X, you are now too old to go clubbing. Currys PC World’s study “The Great Indoors,” which surveyed the social habits of adults, revealed that staying in has become the new night out. The 5,000 respondents concluded that 31 is the age they prefer ditching clubs for comfy nights in; 37 is the age deemed “too old” to go out clubbing.

On a slightly savage note, 37% of respondents agreed that there’s nothing more “tragic” than spotting people in their 40s or 50s surrounded by men or women in their 20s in clubs and bars. Apparently, even the hippies from the '70s—the ones from the disco decade who practically defined club culture—aren’t immune to the age limit.

Survey says: There’s nothing more “tragic” than spotting people in their 40s or 50s surrounded by men or women in their 20s in clubs and bars.

Nearly half of the respondents dread social events and nights out and no longer consider clubbing their “scene.” Meanwhile, six out of 10 find the cost of clubbing too pricey, and 29% would rather not wake up with a raging hangover the morning after. The hassle that comes with clubbing, like the having to get dressed up, arranging babysitters, and booking taxis also played a factor in retiring from nightclubs.

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Moreover, almost half of the respondents would rather trade their tequila for takeout, kick back at home in their comfiest clothes. Thirty percent consider just sitting in front the TV while binging on a boxset as the perfect night out, while others prefer browsing social media and playing computer games. Overall, 29% consider themselves to still have active social lives, only their weekend schedules include takeout, movie marathons, and karaoke.

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Noting the energy that goes with being a social butterfly at parties and clubs, Matt Walburn, Brand and Communications Director of Currys PC World, said, “The Great Indoors study recognizes the fact that there comes a time when we appreciate our home comforts more than a hectic social life.”

It's also worth noting that 7 out of 10 respondents were relieved when they stopped frequenting clubs searching for prospects, because that meant they finally met the someone to share their cozy couch nights in with.  

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Anri Ichimura
Staff Writer, Esquire Philippines
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