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Drinking Six Cups of Coffee a Day Impacts Brain Health, According to Study

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Coffee, though a little pricey in the Philippines, is enjoyed multiple times a day by some Filipinos. While a cup of joe has plenty of benefits—like, you know, getting you through the day—it still has to be consumed in moderation.

Don't hate us but a new study says too much coffee affects your brain health... and not in a good way. In fact, it might shrink brain volume and put you at higher risk for dementia. We wish it weren't real but researchers looked at data from 17,702 participants to come up with the study's results.

"Accounting for all possible permutations, we consistently found that higher coffee consumption was significantly associated with reduced brain volume—essentially, drinking more than six cups of coffee a day may be putting you at risk of brain diseases such as dementia and stroke," says the University of South Australia's Kitty Pham.

Researchers aren't particularly sure why a high intake of coffee (six cups to be exact) may lead to reduced brain volume. But, they're doing more studies to figure out how caffeine and coffee interact with brain cells. So, we'll find out soon enough.

"Typical daily coffee consumption is somewhere between one and two standard cups of coffee," says epidemiologist Elina Hyppönen from the University of South Australia. "Of course, while unit measures can vary, a couple of cups of coffee a day is generally fine."

If you drink more than a couple on the daily, then it may be time to kick that habit.

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h/t: Science Daily

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Paolo Chua
Paolo Chua is the Associate Style Editor of Esquire Philippines.
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