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NFT Alert: Home Video 'Charlie Bit My Finger' Sold For P36.6 Million

Looks like Charlie is a very rich boy now.
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Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) continue to take the internet by storm. The 2007 home video "Charlie Bit My Finger" was sold for a whopping $761,000 (P36.6 million) on Sunday, which marked the video's 14th anniversary on YouTube.

The 55-second clip was one of the first viral posts on the internet and features British baby Charlie adorably biting his toddler brother Harry's finger. The babies have since grown into youths who are now $761,000 richer thanks to the advent of NFTs.

After the purchase of the NFT, the video will now be removed from YouTube despite having over 883 million views so that the highest bidder, an account called "3fmusic," will be "the sole owner of this lovable piece of internet history."

Of course, that doesn't take into account the thousands of copied and reposted versions of the video that's out of the Davies-Carr family's control. But NFTs aren't purchased for novelty or exclusivity. The NFT collectible offers only the blockchain-created certificate of authenticity for the digital asset. In layman's terms, it means that while the GIF, art, or video can be reproduced on the Internet, an NFT auction gives buyers something more valuable to them: bragging rights.

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The NFT auction gathered sizeable offers from 11 anonymous accounts, ending with a bidding war between users "memaster" and "3fmusic," the latter of whom won the bid.

He or she now joins the ranks of the other anonymous buyers behind the most expensive NFTs of all time, some of which are early Internet memorabilia like "Charlie Bit My Finger."

But to this day, the most expensive NFT is still Beeple's collage, Everydays: the First 5000 Days, which was sold for a whopping $69.3 million.

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Anri Ichimura
Section Editor, Esquire Philippines
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