Fashion

James Bond's watches of choice

Tracing two decades of Omegas as James Bond's timepiece of choice, and marking his latest iteration onscreen with special-edition watches (sans grappling hooks).
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James Bond has always had an affinity for beautiful timepieces. In the novel On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1963), Bond scribe Ian Fleming lists “a heavy Rolex Oyster Perpetual on an expanding metal bracelet” as Esquire's favorite fictional spy's only weapons, apart from his hands and feet and a Gillette razor. 

Onscreen, Bond has worn Rolex, Breitling, Hamilton, and Seiko. But for the past two decades, 007 has chosen Omega as his watch of choice. Its first appearance was in Goldeneye (1995) where Pierce Brosnan as Bond wore a Seamaster Diver 300M. The watch with its distinctive blue dial perfectly echoed the spy's naval history and passion for diving. Brosnan would wear the same model thrice in Tomorrow Never Dies (1997), The World is Not Enough (1999), and Die Another Day (2002). Fun thing to know: the Seamasters were fitted with gadgetry, a detonator, a grappling hook, and a laser, respectively.

Fun thing to know: the Seamasters were fitted with gadgetry, a detonator, a grappling hook, and a laser, respectively.

With the latest Bond iteration, Daniel Craig, in Casino Royale (2006), two new Omegas were chosen: the Seamaster Diver 300M Co-Axial and the Planet Ocean 600M Co-Axial. In Quantum of Solace (2008), Craig sported the Planet Ocean once more, while in Skyfall (2012), the Aqua Terra was introduced. Now, as Spectre (the 24th Bond film!) hits the screens, Omega presents two watches fit for the world’s most beloved spy-and for you, too.

The Seamaster 300 Spectre Limited Edition marks the 24th Bond film

With the release of the Seamaster 300 Spectre Limited Edition, you can finally dress your wrist with the exact watch used in the film. Features to look out for include a bi-directional rotating diving bezel, a LiquidMetal 12-hour scale that keeps time in any country in the world (ideal for a person on the move), and the “lollipop” central seconds hands.

Of course, the watch is chock-full of Bond details, from the black-and-gray strap aka the James Bond NATO strap to the 007 gun logo engraved on the strap holder. Wearers are also given their own serial number (there are only 7,007 pieces), which will be printed on the back. This personal identity is complemented by the engraving of SPECTRE.

The Seamaster Aqua Terra 150M, limited to 15,007 pieces.

Not to be outdone, the Seamaster Aqua Terra 150M, limited to 15,007 pieces, features the Bond family coat of arms. The symbol is interlocked repeatedly to create a dynamic pattern on the blue dial. It also appears near the tip of the seconds hand, a nice touch.

But the most striking element of the Aqua Terra is the oscillating movement that can be seen on the watch's back. The component is cut to resemble a gun barrel, another iconic Bond motif.

No spy would be complete without his gadgetry. The Spectre is powered by the Omega Master Co-Axial calibre 8400, while the Aqua Terra is equipped with the Omega Master Co-Axial calibre 8507. What will you choose?

This article originally appeared in our November 2015 issue.

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