Watches

Omega's Seamaster Planet Ocean Ultra Deep Sets a New Standard for Dive Watches

Pushing the boundaries in performance is something all watchmakers claim to do, one way or another. But none have dared what Omega just accomplished.
IMAGE COURTESY

Pushing the boundaries in performance is something all watchmakers claim to do, one way or another. Relatively few however go to the lengths of the serious dive watch specialists. Omega yesterday launched a civilian version of a concept dive watch it first tested back in 2019 in the deepest waters on the planet, the Mariana Trench, reaching a depth a shade under 11,000 meters. That was something of a giant concept watch (in every sense). A shade over 55mm in diameter and 28mm thick it was not for public wrists. But Omega’s new versions of this watch bring extreme science and a serious 6000m depth rating within the reach of us mere surface swimmers.

The Seamaster Planet Ocean Ultra Deep is now available in a reduced (albeit still hefty) size and in a variety of options. Top of the pile and closest in looks and spirit to the original test version is in grade 5 micro-blasted titanium. It’s still big and bold (45.5mm in diameter and 18mm thick) in a number of obvious ways–not least the asymmetric shape (swelling on the right-hand side to protect the crown) and the “manta” style lugs which are conceived only to accept NATO-style straps–the little gaps in the fixed lugs recall the Cephalic fins that Mantas use to feed. It’s a nice nautical touch that also underlines that this is a serious dive watch. A production sample of the titanium Ultra deep reached a depth of 6269m below sea level when it too was tested in the Mariana Trench. The degree of performance required to attain such depths involved four new patents–crown, case back, crystal gasket and crystal itself related to a pressure resistance capable of withstanding 7.5 tons.

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Caseback of Titanium Ultra deep
Photo by COURTESY.

Seamaster Planet Ocean 6000M Co?Axial Master Chronometer 45.5 mm Ultra Deep

OMEGA
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$12,300.00
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The main thrust of the Ultra Deep release is in a more accessible stainless steel in the same case size but without the asymmetry and with classic integrated straps. (You choose between rubber and an all-new steel bracelet design.) The steel version comes with a white dial and blue ceramic bezel, a blue gradient dial with black ceramic bezel and, in a nod to the first Plante ocean od 2005, a gray gradient with an orange bezel. There’s a lot of newness here too. Omega debuts a new alloy, O-Megasteel (see what they did there?) in this new edition. O-Megasteel is a proprietary stainless-steel alloy that took five years to make and is said to offer far higher resistance to corrosion and pitting than conventional 316L steel and even than higher grade 904L. It’s hardness relative to conventional steel also makes possible, per Omega, a 6000m depth rating that mere 316L could not hope to reach.

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Seamaster Planet Ocean 6000M Co?Axial Master Chronometer 45.5 mm Ultra Deep

OMEGA
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Seamaster Planet Ocean 6000M Co?Axial Master Chronometer 45.5 mm Ultra Deep

OMEGA
omegawatches.com
$11,200.00
SHOP NOW

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Seamaster Planet Ocean 6000M Co?Axial Master Chronometer 45.5 mm Ultra Deep

OMEGA
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$11,600.00
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Nick Sullivan
Nick Sullivan is Creative Director at Esquire, where he served as Fashion Director from 2004 until 2019. Prior to that, he relocated from London with his young family to Boerum Hill, Brooklyn. He has styled and art directed countless fashion and cover stories for both Esquire and Big Black Book (which he helped found in 2006) in exotic, uncomfortable, and occasionally unfeasibly cold locations. He also writes extensively about men's style, accessories, and watches. He describes his style as elegantly disheveled.
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