More articles about: features

 
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In 1582, the Japanese invaded the Philippines. It’s not what you think.
The Japanese have always been important neighbors of the Philippines. In pre-colonial times, Japanese traders made the journey south to places like Cagayan, Pangasinan, and Manila to conduct trade deals. This continued into the age of Spanish colonization, with Japanese Christians even ...
 
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The backstories behind Datu Puti, Ginebra San Miguel, and Jollibee.
Datu Puti is one of the most popular brands in the Philippines, easily associated not with an actual ancient ruler, but with vinegar and other kinds of condiments. But why was the vinegar brand named Datu Puti? Was there really a person ...
 
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The Chinese sided with the British when the latter invaded Manila in 1762.
In 1762, the British invaded Manila. They had help from a traditional enemy: the Chinese.Relations between Spaniards and the Chinese had been fraught for centuries, and a British invasion of Manila was the perfect excuse for the Chinese to help erode Spain’s ...
 
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Negritos have long been the subject of fascination all over the world, but none is more important than the King of all Negritos.
Our history shows that Negritos, like other ethnic groups, have always been marginalized since the day lowlanders took over their lands and conquistadors drove them back into the far reaches of the islands, roaming uncharted mountains and forests. Still, others were sold ...
 
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Aguinaldo had a lot to say about science and how technology can perfect humans.
On February 11, 1929, Emilio Aguinaldo delivered a speech in Spanish that was one of the first ones ever broadcast on television. Back then, TV was a revolutionary piece of technology that many people, including Aguinaldo, knew would change the world forever.The ...
 
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How did he lose the use of his legs?
Of the Filipino intellectuals of the late 19th century—the Rizals, the Paternos, and all the other ilustrados, one man sits comfortably above all of them: the sublime paralytic, Apolinario Mabini.Though a prolific writer and a veteran of two wars, it’s surprising that ...
 
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In his 52-year reign, Sultan Kudarat successfully repelled Spain’s conquests to subdue Mindanao.
In the year 1581, six decades after the arrival of Ferdinand Magellan in the Philippines, Mohammad Dipatuan Kudarat, otherwise known as Sultan Kudarat, was born. Nine years prior, Spanish conquistador Miguel Lopez de Legazpi had already captured Manila, where he had successfully pacified ...
 
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Writer, researcher, father, socialist, politician, Isabelo de los Reyes lived a most charming life.
Ilustrados occupy a unique space in Philippine history. They combined the economic freedom of Chinese mestizos and the ideas of Western liberalism to direct the nation toward a whole new path, away from the colonialism of Mother Spain and into an “enlightened” ...
 
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Facts about our National Hero that may have been overlooked in the teaching of history in classrooms.
Today, June 19, is the birthday of Jose Rizal. Leading experts on Jose Rizal such as Renato Constantino (Veneration Without Understanding, 1970) and Ambeth Ocampo (Rizal Without the Overcoat Revised Edition, 1998) tell us that the first step to appreciating the heroism ...
 
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When they needed a home, the Filipino people opened up theirs.
Visitors to the island of Tubabao, near Guiuan, Eastern Samar, will find the usual features of a small town. A barangay with a few houses, beaches, a market, and also resorts offering lodging and other activities for tourists. If they look hard ...
 
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Letters of Rizal to his family are always interesting pieces of history.
An exceedingly significant letter written by Jose Rizal to his parents has surfaced. Dated October 10, 1883, it is from the collection of historian Epifanio de los Santos, who acquired it from one of the members of the Rizal family. For the ...
 
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There are a thousand ways to skin a cat, and a thousand ways to regain independence.
From 1902 to 1946, the Philippines was occupied as a colony of the United States of America following the aftermath of the Philippine-American War. All throughout the occupation, however, Filipinos struggled bravely to take back their independence and freedom.While the road to ...
 
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It wasn’t just Quezon versus Aguinaldo.
Let’s go back for a bit. The year is 1935. American colonialization has taken hold in the Philippines for the past 20 years and has fully transformed its society. Juan Ponce Enrile is a young nine-year-old boy when he sees this news: ...
 
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Religion and revolution go hand-in-hand, but just how much?
If we had to sum up Philippine history, it would be revolutions and Christianity. It seems that our history is an endless series of kneeling down to pray and taking up arms to fight. Sometimes, prayer and revolt go hand-in-hand. The EDSA ...
 
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Tomas Cloma was a navigator, a dreamer, and a lawyer. Most of all, he was a patriot.
Tomas Cloma is not a name you hear too often these days, but it is one whose importance cannot be understated. He wasn’t a heroic general who died for the glory of the Revolution. He wasn’t a scientist who gave a gift ...
 
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From opportunistic generals to kangaroo courts, some things don’t seem to change.
One hundred twenty-two years ago, one of the most pivotal events in Philippine history occurred: Two brothers, Andres and Procopio, were killed in the mountains of Marogondon. The execution of the Bonifacio brothers on Emilio Aguinaldo’s orders signified a new change in ...
 
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From fighting for the eight-hour work day to ending exploitation, workers around the world unite on May 1 to lose the chains that bind.
For some people, Labor Day is simply another holiday (much better if it falls on a long weekend so people can start planning for LaBoracay—or Labor Union if they really want to be on the nose about it). For millions of workers, ...
 
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Were they simply religious brigands or something else?
In the Jerrold Tarog film Goyo: Ang Batang Heneral, there is a sub-plot about General Gregorio del Pilar trying to stop the “brigands” who were attempting to disrupt activities in Pangasinan. These brigands were members of the Guardia de Honor, but perhaps ...
 
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The documentarist hasn’t worked in almost three decades, sort of.
“Do what you love and you won’t have to work a day in your life,” or so goes the saying. That’s why when someone as acclaimed a journalist as Jay Taruc says he’s done doing award-winning documentaries, people scratch their heads. Hard. ...
 
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They might not be Filipino, but they believed in the country.
There is something romantic about revolution. The idea that all people should be free to forge their destiny naturally attracts people from all walks of life, including those who find common cause with revolutionaries. From Lafayette and the Americans, to Bethune and ...
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