Recommended Videos

More articles about: Ferdinand E. Marcos

 
274 Shares
Absolute power corrupts absolutely...and makes awful laws, apparently.
When President Ferdinand Marcos declared Martial Law in 1972, among the first things he did was grant himself, and only to himself, the power to make the laws of the Philippines. With great power comes great responsibility. With absolute power, ah fuck ...
 
16149 Shares
Leni Robredo, the duly elected Vice President of the Philippines, amid the sound and the fury.
Perhaps for the first time in living memory, we have a Vice President who is more than a ceremonial figure. We should be paying attention to Leni Robredo. Here's an excerpt of our profile on her, the full version of which is ...
 
1028 Shares
"The overthrow of the Marcos dictatorship is the backdrop to the drafting of the 1987 Constitution."
In a statement, the framers of the 1987 Constituion soundly condemned the burial of Ferdinand E. Marcos in the Libingan ng mga Bayani:The overthrow of the Marcos dictatorship is the backdrop to the drafting of the 1987 Constitution.The power of the people ...
 
1649 Shares
The brazenness was palpable. Aided and abetted from on high, Ferdinand E. Marcos was buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani.
The brazenness was palpable. Aided and abetted from on high, Ferdinand E. Marcos was buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani. They may have promised no state monies would be used for his burial, but it has become all to clear that ...
 
167 Shares
I learned that if the people stand together, things can change. Our voices can be heard. Mr. President, Mr. Marcos: Are you hearing us now?
I was at the first EDSA rally, way back in 1986. I was all of eight years old then, but I knew something big was going on. My grandmother felt the need to go, and to take me. I remember her telling ...
 
385 Shares
Instead of learning from one of the darkest periods in our history, we are honoring the architect of our national tragedy.
Addressing something as important as the issue of the burial of Ferdinand E. Marcos in the Libingan ng mga Bayani is difficult, challenging to say the least. Narratives and counter-narratives abound around even minor flash points in history; what more something as ...
 
29 Shares
Today, the Marcos family has almost successfully re-imagined Martial Law as a sort of Golden Age of benevolent authoritarianism. How does a nation push back?
Editor's note: This is the final installment of a three-part series outlining our contemporary remembrance of Martial Law. The first of the author's op-ed piece, "Why has Marcos' propaganda lived on?" examines the effects of Martial Law denialism, perhaps best manifested in ...
 
59 Shares
By the numbers: Extrajudicial killings, human rights violations, impunity, corruption, the squandering of our economic dynamism. For the aggrandizement of one family.
Denying Martial Law is a denial of the pain and suffering of victims and their families. Blood money will not assuage that, though it will help the victims. It is a recognition of their suffering, of all they went through, small though ...
 
80 Shares
On Marcos' myth-making, and how it has resonated via our increasing collective denial of what occurred during his Martial Law. First of three parts.
He understood, perhaps instinctively, the power of a compelling, mythologizing historical narrative [1]. One of his key efforts was to re-craft Philippine history, not in his image, but in support of his authoritarian rule [2]. History became a tool of internally focused ...
 
33 Shares
The copyright page puts its year of publication at 1983; as far as we can tell, the book was ordered destroyed before the People Power Revolution of 1986.
These photos are from a book missing from our libraries. The copyright page of Valor: World War II Saga of Ferdinand E. Marcos puts its year of publication at 1983. As far as we can tell, the book was ordered destroyed before ...
 
Share
Imelda's DJ shares how the high life in the Marcoses' Malacañang raged on as the rest of the Philippines bore the atrocities of Martial Law.
Editor's note: The following is a recounting of the high life in the Marcoses' Malacañang raging on—as the rest of the Philippines bore the atrocities of the Martial Law regime (which officially began in 1972 and was "lifted" in 1981, with Ferdinand E. Marcos reserving ...
Connect With Us