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More articles about: intellectual

 
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It's still up for debate.
It is uncontested that a vast majority of people are only familiar with Juan Luna as an expatriate painter. Like all other heroes discussed in school textbooks, rarely do teachers and students pay any attention to their idiosyncrasies and character flaws, which ...
 
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Why 'normal' is the cause of all this chaos.
From the way we raise our families to the highest decision-making bodies, humanity seems to be in agreement that we are far better and wiser than our ancestors. With our cars, technology, sciences, electricity, and other conveniences previously unavailable to us for ...
 
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The worst might be yet to come.
The Philippines has yet to peak and flatten the curve of the COVID-19 pandemic on home turf, but there are already worries of a second surge occurring when lockdown is lifted. And we are right to be worried—Singapore, which thought it had ...
 
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Some call it the lesser evil. Others call it genocide.
As lockdowns put the strain on countries around the world, the “herd immunity” strategy is rearing its head again as countries like Sweden continue to let their citizens continue their daily lives.Lockdowns and quarantines, while stressed by the World Health Organization, are ...
 
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Defining the new normal.
Generations prior have experienced this situation, but only now have we faced a global health emergency of this magnitude in recent memory. The COVID-19 pandemic will continue to challenge all dimensions of our lives in the unforeseeable future, shaking the foundations and ...
 
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Pancho Villa was the Pacquiao before Pacquiao.
"Viva Villa!" On June 18, 1923, the cheers of over 20,000 fans echoed through the New York Polo Grounds Stadium. “Viva Villa! Viva Villa!” A 22-year-old rising star from the Philippines, Pancho Villa competed for the World Flyweight Championship against Jimmy Wilde. ...
 
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All hail the one-day emperor of the Philippines.
There’s no doubt that the first seeds of Philippine consciousness were only actualized in 1872, the same year as the mutiny in Cavite and the execution of Gomburza. It’s the cornerstone of our past, but in this episode of the lost footnotes ...
 
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Disaster architecture is a thing, apparently.
While everyone is stuck at home during lockdown, you can still visit—via Google Maps—the Baroque churches of the Philippines and wonder at the country’s pride and joy. These centuries-old churches are a testament to faith, history, and resilience. There are currently four ...
 
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Online classes is the new socioeconomic divide.
Before the lockdowns and the curfews happened, driving at night through barely-lit backroads in rural areas would guarantee running into teenagers huddled by the side of the road or perhaps lounging on the concrete benches of a closed sari-sari store. One could ...
 
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Competency is punished, while incompetency is shown empathy.
It doesn’t take a genius to realize that justice is selective in the Philippines. This is a country notorious for its impunity—a justice system that serves the few instead of the many. This is our normal, and it’s never become more apparent ...
 
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A quest to reclaim the happiness of reading.
“I am having a hard time reading books now,” seems to be a catchphrase which I’ve been hearing a lot from my circle of friends whom I’ve always identified with as fellow booklovers. Mind you, some of these are the same people ...
 
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Why are we not testing more people? The answer is 'it’s complicated.'
“Test! Test! Test!” says the World Health Organization. South Korea tested nearly 200,000 people. Why can’t everyone do the same? Why is the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) having such a hard time with their “kits,” and why did ...
 
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An essay by a Filipino living in Italy, where COVID-19 has killed over 2,000 patients and placed the entire country under lockdown.
As I write these words, the sky outside the window is overcast. It looks bitter and hard like concrete. The empty, quiet roads, the closed shutters, and drawn curtains of houses all exude an air of defeat. Even the birds are unusually ...
 
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Meet David Fagen, the turncoat-turned-guerrilla of the Philippine-American War.
December 5, 1901. A hunter named Anastacio Bartolome brought a severed head to the American military outpost at Bongabon, Nueva Ecija. The mutilated head was decomposed beyond recognition. The hunter insisted it was the head of the notorious insurrecto, David Fagen. The ...
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