More articles about: opinion

 
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Our identity as a nation is continuously evolving, and it needs continuing discussion. Esquire Philippines presents a collection of essays offering different perspectives on the necessarily nuanced and complex question of Being Filipino.
We are a country made up of 7,641 islands, with almost 105 million people speaking 183 living languages. And yet it seems we haven't thought enough about what it means to be Filipino.It's been over 70 years since Carlos P. Romulo wrote "I Am a Filipino," ...
 
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At the end of 2018, Tsinoys now find themselves confronting the ugly specter of racism once more.
Remember the two photos that went viral in the past few months? One was of a shirtless man who cut the line at a clothing store, and another was of a woman letting her child poop in the grass at BGC. Remove the race/ ethnicity from ...
 
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At some point, naivete crosses over into bigotry.
There are preconceived notions about Muslims in the Philippines, some of them are insulting in a racist kind of way—as in the way Ramon Tulfo demonizes Meranaws, or Winnie Monsod makes sweeping generalizations about people with Chinese ancestry. These notions are bigoted, ...
 
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In the wake of Solita Monsod's controversial column, let's parse what it means to talk about racism, nationalism, and being "Chinese," "Tsinoy," or "Filipino."
Teresita Ang See recently responded to Winnie Monsod's anti-Chinese and anti-Tsinoy ramblings with this piece. I agree with much of it. But I it find very interesting that while "Tsinoy" is seen as hybrid and complex in its identifications, "Filipino" identity here, ...
 
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Caroline S. Hau continues the hot debate about Chinese-Filipinos and their place in Philippine society.
Solita Monsod has seen fit to respond to my critique of her Inquirer article “Why Filipinos Distrust China” with yet another article, which essentially regurgitates her assertions without really addressing the points I raise about her basing her generalizations on her personal experience. Like I said, her ...
 
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Teresita Ang-See outlines why Winnie Monsod is misguided in her column about Tsinoys.
My friends, Tsinoys and native Filipinos alike, have been calling my attention to the deluge of negative comments about the influx of Chinese nationals, especially from the mainland and other issues. They worry that the negativity may spill over to include Chinese ...
 
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Let us take a moment to mourn the death of civil discourse and friendly disagreement, especially when it comes to family members.
Politics was never a four-letter word in our family. I was raised by parents who exposed me to their political leanings and philosophies, and encouraged me to participate in political debate.My family stood by my five-year-old self in April 1978, when we ...
 
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An explanation for Solita "Mareng Winnie" Monsod, who does not believe in the loyalty of Tsinoys.
I am very disturbed by the view being perpetrated by certain writers conflating Chinese from mainland China and Chinese-Filipinos as one and the same when it comes to their political affiliation and identity. Recently, Solita Monsod stated that “I have often observed…that a ...
 
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A reprint of "If," the Philippines Free Press editorial for August 23, 1986.
If they had sent a limousine to the airport instead of a van, Marcos and Imelda would still be in Malacañang. The Conjugal Dictatorship, as the author of the book with that title called the regime, would still be in dictatorial power—to ...
 
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Florianne Jimenez has lived in the US since 2013, and lived through the watershed 2016 elections that saw Donald Trump take the presidency. What is it like to be brown and foreign in America today?
I lived through the 2016 elections in what is arguably one of the most progressive areas of the United States—a New England college town. It’s the kind of place where there are Black Lives Matter, Free Tibet, and Immigrants Welcome Here signs ...
 
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Like James Gunn, her old Tweets have come back to haunt her. Should she also lose her job over them?
Mocha Uson is an open book. This is partially how she's arrived at where she is today: not just a five-million-strong political force on social media, but also the Assistant Secretary of the Presidential Communications Operations Office. By relying on little else than candor, she has ...
 
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A reflection on what all that ugliness revealed about us as a people
It doesn’t really matter who started it. What matters is that our men allowed an official, world-stage basketball game to escalate into a vicious street-corner brawl. What matters is that our national sportsmen were so shamefully unsportsmanlike to their opponents, visitors to ...
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