Women We Love

Watch: A Conversation With Olivia d’Aboville

The half-French, half-Filipina artist is going back to her roots for her exhibition at Art Fair Philippines this year
IMAGE Artu Nepomuceno
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She may not be aware of it, but in just a few years, Olivia d’Aboville has become one of the leading figures of modern Philippine art. The half-French, half-Filipina artist nursed an interest in biology growing up, but eventually elected to pursue a degree in textile design at an art school in Paris. 

IMAGE: Artu Nepomuceno
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After a buzzworthy debut exhibition at the Ayala Museum, d’Aboville has maintained a steady career in the arts—accepting commissions and working with various other materials, including textiles and traditional Filipino weaves, to create expressions of nature and self. Through her father and husband, she is also heavily involved with the Malasimbo Festival, a multi-day music and arts festival in Puerto Galera that has attracted fans throughout and outside the country. In between all that, she even found time to get married a start a family. 

This month, she goes back to her roots for her exhibition at the annual Art Fair Philippines. In this interview, she talks about what her inspirations, her love and passion for the environment and preserving nature, and how artists can find possibilities in order to create a viable career out of their art.

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About The Author
Paul John Caña
Associate Editor, Esquire Philippines
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