Lifestyle

SAVE THIS: How to Stay Safe During a Flood

Flooding is an all-too-common occurrence in the Philippines, so it’s best to be prepared.
IMAGE Wikimedia Commons - Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
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We’re all used to a little flooding here and there, especially in the Philippines' notoriously wet rainy season. But every once in a while the rain keeps pouring, to the extent that those rising waters become a real threat. If you live in or regularly pass through flood-prone areas and thoroughfares, it’s best to be prepared. Here are some tips for staying safe during a flood.

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If a family member regularly takes medication, make sure to include it in their grab-and-go bag. Don’t forget to pack some food for your family pet if you have one, too.


The last thing you want is to get electrocuted when floodwater enters your home. Play it safe by turning your utilities off if flooding is imminent.


Remember that your possessions aren’t worth you and your loved ones’ lives. If the government tells you to evacuate, take your grab-and-go bags and get out of there. Avoid returning to your home until the authorities say it’s safe to do so.


Needless to say, floating furniture can be a hazard to people trying to escape the flood, and it could damage your own house and vehicle. So play it safe and secure your furniture. You might want to move your electronics to the second floor, along with items that are valuable or have sentimental value.

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Fun fact: it only takes a foot of moving water to sweep a vehicle away.


Still, it’s better to avoid walking through a flood as much as possible to avoid the risk of contracting diseases like leptospirosis.

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Don’t be the next guy to go viral when passersby upload videos of you and your stalled car. It’s better to wait out the flood than to go broke paying for car repairs.


Some bridges can get swept away by flash floods.


As we’ve said, just six inches of water can already sweep you off your feet, so you’ll be safer inside or on top of your vehicle. Roll down your window to climb out, since the water pressure will make it difficult or even impossible to open your door. According to Cars.com, if the window won’t open, you’ll need to wait for the water pressure inside and outside the car to equalize before you’ll be able to open the door. This means waiting until the water has risen to your neck. Stay calm and don’t waste your energy trying to open the door beforehand.

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About The Author
Angelica Gutierrez
Angelica is currently Editorial Assistant for Esquiremag.ph.
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